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{UAH} JOE BIDEN CLAIMS TO HAVE BECOME A SENATOR 180 YEARS AGO

Joe Biden says that he began Senate career ‘180 years ago’

A screengrab from Joe Biden's address to the US Conference of Mayors Saturday. YouTube

 

He looks pretty good for 220 years old.

Joe Biden said on live television Saturday that he started his Senate career “180 years ago.”

The Democratic presidential contender and former vice president made the odd statement during a live address to the US Conference of Mayors that was being broadcast in real time on C-SPAN.

Biden began by praising mayors for taking care of Americans’ practical day-to-day needs, and for being on the front lines during fires, floods, health emergencies and school shootings.

“That’s why I’ve made it a priority my entire career to work closely with you,” he said with a smile, “from the time I got to the Senate 180 years ago,” he added, giving a short chuckle.

“You know?” he added. “As well as my tenure as vice president.”

Biden served as a Democratic senator from Delaware from 1973 to 2009 — for a total of 37 years.

EM         -> { Trump for 2020 }

On the 49th Parallel          

                 Thé Mulindwas Communication Group
"With Yoweri Museveni, Ssabassajja and Dr. Kiiza Besigye, Uganda is in anarchy"
                    
Kuungana Mulindwa Mawasiliano Kikundi
"Pamoja na Yoweri Museveni, Ssabassajja na Dk. Kiiza Besigye, Uganda ni katika machafuko"

 

{UAH} Beautiful.....

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{UAH} SHOTS FIRED OUTSIDE TAYLOR SWIFT'S TOWN HOUSE

Shots fired outside Taylor Swift’s Tribeca pad

Taylor SwiftNeilson Barnard/Getty Images

Bullets were flying outside Taylor Swift’s ritzy Tribeca townhouse Sunday evening when shots broke out during an armed robbery at a local shop — the second shooting on the upscale block in a month, sources and witnesses said.

The robbery took place at Patron of New York, a sneaker store at 151 Franklin Street shortly after 5 p.m., next door to the Grammy-winning pop star’s $18 million home, with police recovering several shell casings from the scene.

Police said four shots were fired, though no one was hit.

“Suddenly we heard four shots and I was freaked out,” said a waiter at the nearby Tamarind Tribeca restaurant on Hudson Street.

“I saw people at the scene run. They look scared and jumped into a car.”

One local resident told The Post it was the second shootout on the block in a month.

“It’s really concerning to see two gun-related crimes happen at the same place within a month,” the person said.

“It’s a family neighborhood, and I choose safety over access to fancy sneakers every time.”

Police said three suspects fled eastbound, two wearing blue jeans and white T-shirts, and a third blue jeans with a blue T-shirt.

Swift bought the swanky townhouse at 153 Franklin Street for $18 million in 2017 and owns three apartments next door at 155 Franklin. In all, she has spent about $50 million on properties on the block.

Last year Swift beat a lawsuit filed by the real estate broker who claimed the crooner cheated him out of more than $1 million in fees for the purchase.

EM         -> { Trump for 2020 }

On the 49th Parallel          

                 Thé Mulindwas Communication Group
"With Yoweri Museveni, Ssabassajja and Dr. Kiiza Besigye, Uganda is in anarchy"
                    
Kuungana Mulindwa Mawasiliano Kikundi
"Pamoja na Yoweri Museveni, Ssabassajja na Dk. Kiiza Besigye, Uganda ni katika machafuko"

 

{UAH} News Anchor Compares Black Co-Anchor to a Gorilla On-Air

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{UAH} Stroke: The silent killer

Stroke: The silent killer

By Samuel Lutwama

Added 27th September 2020 11:42 PM

Worldwide, stroke is a leading cause of death and of chronic disability, with an estimated 15 million people reported to suffer a stroke annually.

Stroke: The silent killer

The late Bruno Joseph Kibiira was a sufferer of stroke. (Credit: Samuel Lutwama)

HEALTH

According to the World Health Organization (WHO) data published in 2017, stroke claimed the lives of 12,147 Ugandans.

Worldwide, stroke is a leading cause of death and of chronic disability. It is estimated that 15 million people suffer a stroke annually. Of these, five million die and another five million are left permanently disabled, placing a burden on families and communities.

General data on stroke in Uganda is, however, limited.

A cross-sectional population survey on stroke knowledge and attitudes in Greater Kampala conducted in 2017 in Mukono district indicates that stroke knowledge is generally poor. Stress and hypertension were noted to be the leading perceived risk causes of stroke in Uganda.


Neuro-physician Dr. Mark Kaddumukasa of Mulago Referral Hospital says prevalence of stroke risk factors may vary with gender and age due to individual risk factors. The life expectancy for women is longer and their stroke onset usually begins later than it does for men.

He says stroke is a serious medical condition that requires medical attention. Unfortunately, many people ignore the telltale stroke signs until the situation reaches a potentially devastating medical stage which leads to disability or death.

Two years ago, Andrew Kaweere suffered a sudden diabetic stroke while taking his early morning breakfast in Kampala.

Kaweere, who is 45 now, had for long ignored the warning stroke signs that usually affect diabetic people, including blurred vision and weakness in the legs and arms, which normally happens in brief intervals.

After some time, these symptoms graduated to a full-brown stroke that almost put him out of action with frail mobility.

Kaweere, a real estate dealer, recalls the fateful day. He woke up as usual and set out for work. While having breakfast at a busy city restaurant, his sight suddenly became blurry and he collapsed. He had been hit by an ischemic stroke, which Kaddumukasa says occurs when an artery in the brain becomes blocked and restricts the flow of blood, causing the brain cells (neurons) to stop working, hence a stroke.

"I was rushed to Nsambya Hospital in critical condition where I spent some time confined in coma," recalls Kaweere.

The preliminary medical checks were done, confirming he had suffered a stroke prone to diabetic people. The medical report further revealed that his blood sugar levels and high blood pressure - key factors for the occurrence of a stroke - had hit dangerous levels. He was put on medication that normalized his blood sugar levels and controlled his blood pressure.

After he had stabilized and was discharged, Kaweere had to endure the long ordeal of treatment and the uncompromising realities of battling with stroke. He soldiered on.

After his recovery, he still felt part of his body side feeling numb as he still battled with persistent neuropathic pain, which is associated with impaired quality of life.

"My motor function was impaired as it wasn't easy for me to walk and function normally," he says.  However, the most humiliating battle was in his mind. He wondered how he would survive with a stroke and the prospect of failing to provide for his family weighed heavily down on him.

 "I was scared that I would be home-bound for the rest of my life and I also worried for not providing for my family," recalls the father of five school-going children.

His desire and will to get better paid off. He was told about Stroke Rehabilitation Centre in Wampewo, Kasangati, where he was taken through physiotherapy treatment.

Today, after receiving rehabilitation exercise, Kaweere says that the nerve pain has greatly reduced and his motor is slowly improving.

"After receiving physiotherapy treatment, I was able to get back to work and started carrying on with my family duties, of course with the help of my wife."

Andrew Kaweere, a stroke victim, underwent rehabilitation - and has since improved



Ibrahim Bukenya, the principal physiotherapist at Stoke Rehabilitation Centre who handled Kaweere's physiotherapy treatment, confirms that he had suffered an ischemic stroke.

Bukenya says there two types of stroke: the ischemic occurs when an artery supplying oxygen-rich blood to the brain becomes blocked and forms clots which creates blockages that leads to brain stroke. The hemorrhagic stroke, in the other hand, is caused by rupture blood vessels resulting from a weakened vessel that ruptures and bleeds into the surrounding brain, causing high blood pressure that leads to stroke.


Kaweere's experience is not so different from the late Bruno Joseph Kibiira, a former senior civil servant at the education ministry. Eight years ago, he suffered a similar fate. He arrived at this workplace in Kampala, where he was scheduled for a meeting with his boss.

Kibiira opted to do the stairs. On his way up, he became numb and collapsed. A rescue team took him to Mulago Referral Hospital, before he was flown to India where he received treatment for stroke and heart-related problems.

The stroke marked his premature exit from civil service and for the rest of his life he was home-bound and often hospitalized until his death on February 12 this year due to stroke and other related complications.

Dr. Kaddumukasa says increased stroke knowledge and education is crucial. Ignoring short-lived stroke symptoms in the early stage and unhealthy lifestyles, according to him, is the main cause of the stroke burden in Uganda.

 "If there was a structured self-management programme to support the high-risk group and help them to adhere to a healthy lifestyle, which includes proper diet and regular exercise, the risk of falling victim to stroke would be minimal."

The tell-tale signs

Bukenya says some of the symptoms of stroke are often ignored because at times they go away, but if they are not attended to, may lead to death.

He notes loss of balance or coordination and trouble in walking as some of the signs.

 "People experiencing difficult in speaking and comprehending things, with speech incoherent with stammers may be at risk," says Bukenya.

"Disturbed vision such as experiencing blurred vision or double vision, whereby one object appears as two, paralysis or numbness of some of parts of the body, severe headache that may be accompanied by vomiting, dizziness or altered consciousness, are among other revealing signs."

Bukenya says the longer the stroke goes untreated, the greater the potential for brain damage and disability.

He thus advises regular checkup for blood pressure, blood glucose, cholesterol levels, heart diseases, health diet lifestyle and regular exercise at least 20 minutes every day as one of the ways of managing stroke occurrences.

Causes

Kaddumukasa says the triggers for most of the stroke are medically known and can easily be managed at their onset. Unfortunately, most of them are ignored until when the situation is almost irreversible. He says people with high blood pressure are more prone to have suffer a stroke during their life time.

He further explains that there is an undeniable link between heart disease and stroke. "People with heart diseases and experiencing cardiac arrest are at high risk of suffering stroke."

The heart disease risk factor can be controlled or treated with healthy dietary lifestyle and engaging in regular exercise.

Other factors that may cause stroke include blood clotting disease and dietary causes like too much sodium intake which leads to high blood pressure increasing the risk of stroke.

Prevention

Kaddumukasa subscribes to the notion that "prevention is better than cure," and therefore gives preventive measures on how to control stroke occurrence.

People with blood pressure problems should maintain a healthy lifestyle and strict physical exercise routine.

He advises those who had suffered stroke before to avoid getting another bout because the chances of survival are minimal, after all, "once beaten, twice shy."

Bukenya recommends regular exercise, a healthy diet which includes eating more fruits and vegetables, avoiding alcohol and cigarette smoking for those who want to dramatically reduce their risk of having stroke, avoiding compromising stressful situation and regular blood pressure, glucose and cholesterol checks up, among others.

Life after physiotherapy treatment

Bukenya says there are benefits for patients to receive physiotherapy treatment which includes helping the stroke patients to rebuild their lives and manage to walk again by themselves.

If administered well, physiotherapy can help a patient resume working duties and provide for their family. It also helps to prevent disabilities and reduce pain, numbness and lack of sensations.

Kaddumukasa says the government has not been silent on the increasing stroke burden in Uganda, as it has put in place medical facilities in most of the government hospitals to counter the growing medical threat.

_____________________________
"Even a small dog can piss on a tall building", Jim Hightower
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Bored Homer Simpson GIF

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{UAH} rump's Taxes: 18 Revelations from a Trove of Records - The New York Times

Friends

 

And to a man like myself that owns a company and self-employed, good for him. The reason many of us run out of offices is not for we are not smart ass as Peter Simon Okurut, we are running from taxes. Next week I am applying for the business loan granted by the Feds, they are lending you 50,000 dollars you are paying back 40,000 dollars. My gas is written off, most of my office expenditures are written off, most of my travel expenses are written off. Peter Simon Okurut with his hilarious degree out of half torched Makerere does not qualify yet I do,  for I own a company.

 

It is being smart and I thank New York times for raising what we all knew all along.                     -> Next topic  !!!!!!

 

EM         -> { Trump for 2020 }

On the 49th Parallel          

                 Thé Mulindwas Communication Group
"With Yoweri Museveni, Ssabassajja and Dr. Kiiza Besigye, Uganda is in anarchy"
                    
Kuungana Mulindwa Mawasiliano Kikundi
"Pamoja na Yoweri Museveni, Ssabassajja na Dk. Kiiza Besigye, Uganda ni katika machafuko"

 

From: panafricanistforum@yahoogroups.com <panafricanistforum@yahoogroups.com>
Sent: Sunday, September 27, 2020 5:58 PM
To: Defsec <defsec@yahoogroups.com>; Camnet <camnetwork@yahoogroups.com>; DEFSEC 2 <gfemi2000@gmail.com>; tellohio@yahoo.com; obi@gasafrique.com; osamedeedosomwan@yahoo.com; stratepol@outlook.com; oedosomwan@gmail.com; Panafricanist Rostrum <panafricanistforum@yahoogroups.com>; Herrn Edward Mulindwa <mulindwa@look.ca>; Next Kenya <next_kenya@yahoogroups.com>; Nowamagbe Austin Omoigui <nowa_o@yahoo.com>; Osamwonyi Edwyn Igori <edwynigori@gmail.com>; Osamwonyi Igori <osamwonyi@gmail.com>; maililoquy@gmail.com
Subject: [panafricanistforum] Trump’s Taxes: 18 Revelations from a Trove of Records - The New York Times

 

 


__,_._,___

{UAH} The U.S. reckoning on race, seen through other nations’ eyes

Friends

 

Every cause you plead for must be created on a good base. When you start a company everyone wants to know who owns it, who runs it, and who supports it. When you go to borrow money from the bank you must have cosigners that are knows to be people with good repute. One of my kids studied without applying for OSAP, so every year she was in University I was paying for it cash, when she qualified and got a job, banks refused to give her a credit card for she never had a credit. She was invisible to the bank system, thus she had to go to a local Canadian Tire and apply for a credit card. Not having a debt does not mean that you have a good credit, in fact at the time the bank refused to hand her a credit card they were issuing them to people with debts.

 

African Americans can never win a war on racism, if it exists,  when they use drug addicts, dealers, prostitutes, school children prowlers and God damn firkin Coons. It simply will never work.

 

You are fighting a stupid war, but in the process making the rest of us that try to  live normal lives look fools. And you do it is in so many ways, a man stood in a campaign and he told you face on that he was going to blow up ObamaCare. He put it right on the table, I am going to assassin it. And yet he won the election. Think about this, if ObamaCare is that valuable in United States how did he manage to win by going after it? Even if all people that are on ObamaCare refuse to vote for a candidate, he/she can win the election, Obamacare is such a firkin fringe benefit. 10/20 million people will be un insured, so firkin what? And yet you dragged on with a dead horse to the point where the man had to go and hire a direct assassin to the Supreme Court to put it down like a firkin Dog. Can you imagine if you walked the other way, and built a system that is acceptable by more Americans than ObamaCare?

 

It is like fighting him on appointing a judge, a true spectacle is about to begin, I am booking for a vacation from the 12th October to get a good understanding to the death of the Democratic party. They are going to go after her, where she went to school, how she lost her virginity, who screws her kids and who her husband screwed when he was firkin 9 years old. We have seen it all already, and we know exactly what to show up. Here is the question, to what end? What is the Democratic party going to win into all that when she is still going to be confirmed? African Americans are failing as the Democrats are failing, they walk into impeachment, they go to Quid Pro Quo, then they walk the tapes of touching the ass, they are inside the Mueller probe, they are all over the God damn place.

 

From way back when Obama came to power, Republicans have been preaching for good courts, conservative judges, it affect every Catholic, every Christian, every American that goes to church, but it affects even the very few Democrats still remaining out there that are intelligent. When Obama tried to appoint a judge they rejected that idea for we had a court that was going out of the way. Trump campaigned on it and with Mitch at his hand side, he has delivered. But do you know when the Supreme Court was conservatives it is about to be? The last time was 1939. Donald J Trump hate the man but he has resurrected it and if you are not careful he is going appoint in another two judges to that court, and living the office with firkin 5. Trust me there is a reason you were handed the list of judges, and a reason Joe Biden will never deliver it. Those judges are going to work hard to see that the genocide of blacks stop in America, for you wonder why the black population never grows. Is it because every pregnant black girl is advised to pluck it out?

 

African Americans must get a purpose on earth, get people with good repute than the Obama and Nancy Pelosi craps, living into palaces as black kids are being decapitated daily.

EM         -> { Trump for 2020 }

On the 49th Parallel          

                 Thé Mulindwas Communication Group
"With Yoweri Museveni, Ssabassajja and Dr. Kiiza Besigye, Uganda is in anarchy"
                    
Kuungana Mulindwa Mawasiliano Kikundi
"Pamoja na Yoweri Museveni, Ssabassajja na Dk. Kiiza Besigye, Uganda ni katika machafuko"

 

From: ugandans-at-heart@googlegroups.com <ugandans-at-heart@googlegroups.com> On Behalf Of Allan
Sent: Sunday, September 27, 2020 4:02 PM
To: Camnet <camnetwork@yahoogroups.com>; UAH <ugandans-at-heart@googlegroups.com>
Subject: {UAH} The U.S. reckoning on race, seen through other nations' eyes

 

 

By AYA BATRAWY

 

DUBAI, United Arab Emirates (AP) — It's not only in the United States where protests against racial injustice are part of the national conversation. A handful of America's critics have taken note too, using recent months' demonstrations and graphic images of police violence to denounce the country at the United Nations' gathering of world leaders this year.

Iranian President Hassan Rouhani invoked the killing of George Floyd, the Black American man who died after a white police officer in Minneapolis pressed his knee against his neck even as he repeatedly said he could not breathe. Floyd's death, caught on video, set off nationwide protests in support of Black lives.

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Rouhani said the scene was "reminiscent" of Iran's own experience in its quest for freedom and liberation from domination, and that Iran instantly recognized "the feet kneeling on the neck as the feet of arrogance on the neck of independent nations."

Similarly, Syrian Foreign Minister Walid al-Moallem said U.S. sanctions were "an inhumane attempt to suffocate Syrians, just like George Floyd and others were cruelly suffocated in the United States."

Cuba and Venezuela also took jabs at the U.S., making specific references to the protests during words delivered to the U.N. General Assembly.

While the tactic of criticizing the United States for its racial tensions and policies toward Black Americans is decades old, it comes as historians and experts on democracy warn that under President Donald Trump, American moral authority and stature around the world has waned.

"When the United States falters, it ripples across the world. And the United States has long faltered in regard to its racial policy and upholding its promise of equality," said Rachel Kleinfeld, a senior fellow at the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace whose research focuses on democracy and governance.

"In the past, when we've faltered, we've tried to do better," she said. "I think what's different now is that people fear that those ideals and values are possibly slipping."

In his remarks to world leaders at the all-virtual U.N. meeting this week, Trump touted what he called his administration's achievements in advancing religious liberty, opportunity for women and protecting unborn children.

"America will always be a leader in human rights," Trump said. He made no reference to the protests roiling multiple cities as Americans prepare to vote in November's presidential election.

In contrast, Barack Obama spoke directly about America's own "own racial and ethnic tensions" during his U.N. General Assembly remarks in 2014, saying he knew the world took notice of Ferguson, Missouri, where the shooting of an unarmed Black 18-year-old by a police officer set off protests.

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America's critics will be quick to point out "that at times we too have failed to live up to our ideals," he said at the time. "But we welcome the scrutiny of the world — because what you see in America is a country that has steadily worked to address our problems, to make our union more perfect."

Though Trump made no mention of the struggle for racial equality in his speech, others did. Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau said "we aren't going far enough to eliminate systemic injustice, whether it's a question of racism against Black or Indigenous people, homophobia or sexism." The small island chain of Saint Vincent and the Grenadines proclaimed "that Black Lives Matter" and said the case for reparatory justice remains strong.

As the Republican nominee in 2016, Trump seemed to acknowledge that when it came to civil liberties, the U.S "has a lot of problems" that impact America's ability to promote democracy abroad. "I think it's very hard for us to get involved in other countries when we don't know what we are doing and we can't see straight in our own country," Trump told The New York Times that July.

That argument echoes the one the Soviet Union levied against the U.S. during the Cold War, particularly in the civil rights era of the late 1950s and early 1960s under Presidents Dwight D. Eisenhower and John F. Kennedy. Soviet media often portrayed the protests and sit-ins as evidence that racism was systemic of capitalism.

According to a State Department memo in 1963, written just months after Martin Luther King Jr. was arrested in Birmingham, Alabama, Soviet broadcasters portrayed U.S. policies toward Black citizens as "indicative of its policy toward colored peoples throughout the world."

Karl Jacoby, a professor of American history and co-director of the Center for the Study of Ethnicity and Race at Columbia University in New York, said that the U.S. moved to end segregation and push forth the Civil Rights Act as it competed for influence with the Soviet Union in part because "it was untenable to try to be the leader of the democratic world and be undemocratic at home."

"This is really a very old pattern — that the United States finds itself very vulnerable on the international stage because of the hypocrisy of its stated ideals and the actual reality of the treatment of a lot of its citizens," he said.

Cuban President Miguel Diaz-Canel leveraged that vulnerability when he referred to U.S. "imperialism" and the " irrational and unsustainable production and consumption system of capitalism" in his speech at the U.N. General Assembly this week. He said the U.S. was facing "an abundance of practically uncontrolled expressions of hatred, racism, police brutality and irregularities in the election system."

And Venezuelan President Nicolás Maduro, not recognized by Washington as his nation's legitimate leader, blasted U.S. "arrogance." He said the Trump administration's current path will lead to isolation and condemnation, including from U.S. citizens "who have taken to the streets to protest against racism, against police brutality, against abuse."

Iran, Venezuela and Cuba are all under U.S. sanctions, which have tightened under President Trump. The three nations also restrict protests and free speech within their own borders, sometimes harshly:

— Last year, Iranian security forces last year killed at least 300 in anti-government protests and suppressed media coverage, according to Amnesty International.

— Venezuela is in the midst of one of the world's worst refugee crises and a third of the country faces hunger. A U.N. Human Rights Council has accused Maduro's government of crimes, including torture and killings. The U.S. and nearly 60 other nations have called on him to step down.

— In Cuba, there have been dramatic openings in past years, but it remains a one-party communist state where dissent is punishable.

Thomas Carothers, author of "Democracies Divided: The Global Challenge of Political Polarization," said that it becomes harder for the United States to be an effective promoter of democracy abroad when U.S. democracy falls short of its own standards.

"Unquestionably, President Trump has less interest in supporting democracy abroad than any other president in recent American history," said Carothers, who is senior vice president for studies at the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace.

Kleinfeld says the world as a whole is facing a problem of governance.

"Democracies may not always be doing well, and the United States is certainly not doing well," she said. "But there is a chance in democracies that they can do better. They can at least elect their leaders and try to do better."

___

Follow Dubai-based Associated Press journalist Aya Batrawy on Twitter at http://www.twitter.com/ayaelb.

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{UAH} SIX CAPTURED ON CCTV ENTERING BUILDING

Makerere Fire: Six captured on CCTV entering building

By Simon Masaba

Some of the people captured on the CCTV footage are from the finance, human resource and the custodian offices

Police investigators have picked interest in six people who were captured on Makerere University's closed circuit television cameras (CCTV) entering the Main Building before it was gutted by fire.

The footage reportedly captured the six people entering the building, but they were not seen exiting the premises by the time the fire gutted the building. The CCTV footage is a subject of intense analysis by experts.

A fire broke out at the Main Building — Ivory Tower — at Makerere University at 1:05am, on Sunday. Fire fighters got the flames under control just after 12:30pm on Sunday.

Smoke was first reported just after 12:45am at the building, which is located about 200 metres from the university Police station. Police said they detected the fire via their CCTV cameras installed at the university.

No one was hurt and there is no word yet on what caused the fire at the iconic building that was recently renovated. The renovations started in December last year and the exercise ended in February this year.

The fire burnt the finance, audit, human resource and the public relations offices, the university vicechancellor, Prof. Barnabas Nawangwe, said.

"It is a sad day. It is the worst disaster in the university's 100 years of history. This is not how we planned to celebrate 100 years of the best university in the country next year," Nawangwe said.

"I was called and alerted about the fire a few minutes after midnight. The fire caught up very fast. We called fire brigade — unfortunately, the first vehicles (fire brigade) could not push the water high," Nawangwe said, adding that: "By the time cranes came, the fire had entered the roof."

"We have not lost many documents. No disaster at the moment. We have all information digitised," he added.

Investigations

Security sources revealed that six people were last seen at the iconic building, according to the CCTV footage.

The Police are analysing the identities of the six people, but it is believed they are university employees attached to the offices that were affected. Police remained tight lipped on their identities.

There have been ongoing probes linked to projects under the finance office at the university by the Police's Criminal Investigations Directorate (CID).

Another source told New Vision that some of the people captured on the CCTV footage are from the finance, human resource and the custodian offices.

"They were captured on CCTV as they accessed the facility, but were not seen exiting the building at any time, Their conduct is suspected," the source said.

Police forensic investigators spent the great part of yesterday lifting finger prints from ‘three particular doors and two windows at the rear of the historic building.

"The interior is gone," a crime scene officer, who spoke on condition of anonymity, told New Vision on Sunday.

The officer said the cause of the fire is being investigated, but added that a fire brigade officer told him that they suspected a spark from an electricity extension that was placed near a water dispenser.

"The building has no smoke detectors. By the time residents saw it, the fire had spread," the crime scene officer said.

EM         -> { Trump for 2020 }

On the 49th Parallel          

                 Thé Mulindwas Communication Group
"With Yoweri Museveni, Ssabassajja and Dr. Kiiza Besigye, Uganda is in anarchy"
                    
Kuungana Mulindwa Mawasiliano Kikundi
"Pamoja na Yoweri Museveni, Ssabassajja na Dk. Kiiza Besigye, Uganda ni katika machafuko"

 

{UAH} 90 UGANDANS MISS REPATRIATION FROM RWANDA

90 Ugandans miss repatriation from Rwanda

By Job Namanya

Added 27th September 2020 06:04 PM

The exercise was done successfully and the remaining exercise was for health officials to deal with the returnees.

Some of the Ugandans who been repatriated from outside. Courtesy photo

 

A total of 90 Ugandans who had registered at the High commission of Uganda in Kigali have failed to return home.

According to Ann Katusiime, the Deputy Head of missions at the Ugandan high commission in Rwanda, over 350 people had registered for repatriation however some could not show up even on the final day on Wednesday.

"The first batch had 100 Ugandans repatriated, 94 more people followed and Wednesday saw 66 people repatriated. We had booked for more people to travel but when the time came, only these turned up.  When contacted, some told us that they were not ready to return home while others still found comfort in staying in Rwanda," she said.

Katusiime said that those who were repatriated were the stranded ones but those who found it comfortable to stay in Kigali opted to remain and they might consider traveling when borders reopen as soon as possible.


She added that the Ugandans in Rwanda through their association played a key role to support those stranded Ugandans for the last 6 months.

"We were chanced to have a united effort as Ugandans in supporting our own who had lost jobs due to the lockdown. Some who were teachers, bar operators and others who had small jobs here were rendered jobless when COVID-19 set in.

As the commission, we rolled out a registration exercise and we were able to support each other until this time when we had them repatriated," said Katusiime.

Wallace Bindeeba, a senior Immigration officer at Katuna border who received the returnees, said that the exercise had been done successfully and the remaining exercise was for health officials to deal with the returnees.



"The repatriation exercise was successful and we expect the health Ministry to deal with the returnees while they get to settle in the country.  This group will go to Entebbe for quarantine and they will later settle in their respective homes," he said.

Returnees speak out

Gift Akampurira, 30, a teacher from Kanungu district has been in Rwanda for the last 2 years. When the schools closed down for COVID-19, she was among the Ugandans who lost her job and life started getting tough for her.

"I embarked on spending some of my savings to clear the day to day expenditure until my savings were all done. I later called home for assistance and a time reached when home support failed. I learnt that our High commission was registering stranded Ugandans and I opted for registration. We were given maize flour and beans which have been my daily meal until today," she said.

Akampurira who could not hide her excitement upon returning said that she will be glad to taste home food again.

Phionah Nakitende, a mother of 3 who has been teaching in Rwanda said that for the last 6 months, her absence from her family was disastrous to their upbringing and family cohesion.

"As a mother, I used to be in Rwanda and then after a short while I returned to check on my family. My 3 years old child whom I had just weaned was missing that motherly love. I could talk to them on the phone but that was not satisfactory. I feel so joyful that I will be able to meet them again and we smile together," she said.

EM         -> { Trump for 2020 }

On the 49th Parallel          

                 Thé Mulindwas Communication Group
"With Yoweri Museveni, Ssabassajja and Dr. Kiiza Besigye, Uganda is in anarchy"
                    
Kuungana Mulindwa Mawasiliano Kikundi
"Pamoja na Yoweri Museveni, Ssabassajja na Dk. Kiiza Besigye, Uganda ni katika machafuko"

 

{UAH} Bursted: Kibalama is a highly trained Solider (spy) from UK "Did he trick Bobi Wine as reports suggest -


Bursted: Kibalama is a highly trained Solider (spy) from UK "Did he trick Bobi Wine as reports suggest 85 Reading Time: 2 minutes Bursted: Kibalama is a highly trained Solider (spy) from UK "Did he trick Bobi Wine as reports suggest. Many supporters, members and leaders of the National Unity Platform (NUP) party are sympathising with former party president Moses Kibalama Nkoge thinking that he is an ordinary person. 


https://ugnews24.info/uganda-news/bursted-kibalama-is-a-highly-trained-solider-spy-from-uk-did-he-trick-bobi-wine-as-reports-suggest/ 

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{UAH} Only a fool would write off Trump. But there’s a reason he’s so desperate | US elections 2020 | The Guardian

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{UAH} The U.S. reckoning on race, seen through other nations’ eyes


By AYA BATRAWY

DUBAI, United Arab Emirates (AP) — It's not only in the United States where protests against racial injustice are part of the national conversation. A handful of America's critics have taken note too, using recent months' demonstrations and graphic images of police violence to denounce the country at the United Nations' gathering of world leaders this year.

Iranian President Hassan Rouhani invoked the killing of George Floyd, the Black American man who died after a white police officer in Minneapolis pressed his knee against his neck even as he repeatedly said he could not breathe. Floyd's death, caught on video, set off nationwide protests in support of Black lives.

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Rouhani said the scene was "reminiscent" of Iran's own experience in its quest for freedom and liberation from domination, and that Iran instantly recognized "the feet kneeling on the neck as the feet of arrogance on the neck of independent nations."

Similarly, Syrian Foreign Minister Walid al-Moallem said U.S. sanctions were "an inhumane attempt to suffocate Syrians, just like George Floyd and others were cruelly suffocated in the United States."

Cuba and Venezuela also took jabs at the U.S., making specific references to the protests during words delivered to the U.N. General Assembly.

While the tactic of criticizing the United States for its racial tensions and policies toward Black Americans is decades old, it comes as historians and experts on democracy warn that under President Donald Trump, American moral authority and stature around the world has waned.

"When the United States falters, it ripples across the world. And the United States has long faltered in regard to its racial policy and upholding its promise of equality," said Rachel Kleinfeld, a senior fellow at the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace whose research focuses on democracy and governance.

"In the past, when we've faltered, we've tried to do better," she said. "I think what's different now is that people fear that those ideals and values are possibly slipping."

In his remarks to world leaders at the all-virtual U.N. meeting this week, Trump touted what he called his administration's achievements in advancing religious liberty, opportunity for women and protecting unborn children.

"America will always be a leader in human rights," Trump said. He made no reference to the protests roiling multiple cities as Americans prepare to vote in November's presidential election.

In contrast, Barack Obama spoke directly about America's own "own racial and ethnic tensions" during his U.N. General Assembly remarks in 2014, saying he knew the world took notice of Ferguson, Missouri, where the shooting of an unarmed Black 18-year-old by a police officer set off protests.

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America's critics will be quick to point out "that at times we too have failed to live up to our ideals," he said at the time. "But we welcome the scrutiny of the world — because what you see in America is a country that has steadily worked to address our problems, to make our union more perfect."

Though Trump made no mention of the struggle for racial equality in his speech, others did. Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau said "we aren't going far enough to eliminate systemic injustice, whether it's a question of racism against Black or Indigenous people, homophobia or sexism." The small island chain of Saint Vincent and the Grenadines proclaimed "that Black Lives Matter" and said the case for reparatory justice remains strong.

As the Republican nominee in 2016, Trump seemed to acknowledge that when it came to civil liberties, the U.S "has a lot of problems" that impact America's ability to promote democracy abroad. "I think it's very hard for us to get involved in other countries when we don't know what we are doing and we can't see straight in our own country," Trump told The New York Times that July.

That argument echoes the one the Soviet Union levied against the U.S. during the Cold War, particularly in the civil rights era of the late 1950s and early 1960s under Presidents Dwight D. Eisenhower and John F. Kennedy. Soviet media often portrayed the protests and sit-ins as evidence that racism was systemic of capitalism.

According to a State Department memo in 1963, written just months after Martin Luther King Jr. was arrested in Birmingham, Alabama, Soviet broadcasters portrayed U.S. policies toward Black citizens as "indicative of its policy toward colored peoples throughout the world."

Karl Jacoby, a professor of American history and co-director of the Center for the Study of Ethnicity and Race at Columbia University in New York, said that the U.S. moved to end segregation and push forth the Civil Rights Act as it competed for influence with the Soviet Union in part because "it was untenable to try to be the leader of the democratic world and be undemocratic at home."

"This is really a very old pattern — that the United States finds itself very vulnerable on the international stage because of the hypocrisy of its stated ideals and the actual reality of the treatment of a lot of its citizens," he said.

Cuban President Miguel Diaz-Canel leveraged that vulnerability when he referred to U.S. "imperialism" and the " irrational and unsustainable production and consumption system of capitalism" in his speech at the U.N. General Assembly this week. He said the U.S. was facing "an abundance of practically uncontrolled expressions of hatred, racism, police brutality and irregularities in the election system."

And Venezuelan President Nicolás Maduro, not recognized by Washington as his nation's legitimate leader, blasted U.S. "arrogance." He said the Trump administration's current path will lead to isolation and condemnation, including from U.S. citizens "who have taken to the streets to protest against racism, against police brutality, against abuse."

Iran, Venezuela and Cuba are all under U.S. sanctions, which have tightened under President Trump. The three nations also restrict protests and free speech within their own borders, sometimes harshly:

— Last year, Iranian security forces last year killed at least 300 in anti-government protests and suppressed media coverage, according to Amnesty International.

— Venezuela is in the midst of one of the world's worst refugee crises and a third of the country faces hunger. A U.N. Human Rights Council has accused Maduro's government of crimes, including torture and killings. The U.S. and nearly 60 other nations have called on him to step down.

— In Cuba, there have been dramatic openings in past years, but it remains a one-party communist state where dissent is punishable.

Thomas Carothers, author of "Democracies Divided: The Global Challenge of Political Polarization," said that it becomes harder for the United States to be an effective promoter of democracy abroad when U.S. democracy falls short of its own standards.

"Unquestionably, President Trump has less interest in supporting democracy abroad than any other president in recent American history," said Carothers, who is senior vice president for studies at the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace.

Kleinfeld says the world as a whole is facing a problem of governance.

"Democracies may not always be doing well, and the United States is certainly not doing well," she said. "But there is a chance in democracies that they can do better. They can at least elect their leaders and try to do better."

___

Follow Dubai-based Associated Press journalist Aya Batrawy on Twitter at http://www.twitter.com/ayaelb.

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