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{UAH} African-American Women Now Top the List of Most-Educated Group in the Country

African American Women, Education, College Graduates, KOLUMN Magazine

African-American Women Now Top the List of Most-Educated Group in the CountryA NEW STUDY FINDS THAT AFRICAN-AMERICAN WOMEN ACHIEVE THE HIGHEST OUTCOMES OF ANY DEMOGRAPHIC BY RACE AND GENDER.



Statistics on black women and education have shown them leading all other gender and racial groups for a few years now. More than half of all black women specifically between the ages of 18 and 24 are enrolled in college, and black women overall outpace other race and gender groups in terms of college enrollment, according to the National Center of Education Statistics/U.S. Census numbers.

While those figures are noteworthy, a new report goes beyond mere enrollment numbers to show that black women also have the highest numbers where degree-earning is concerned. The findings, also issued by the National Center of Education Statistics, indicate black women led every other race and gender group in this area, making them them—based on hard and fast statistics—the most educated demographic in the country.


From 1999–2000 to 2009–'10, the percentage of degrees earned by females remained between approximately 60 and 62 percent for associate's degrees and between 57 and 58 percent for bachelor's degrees. In contrast, the percentages of both master's and doctor's degrees earned by females increased from 1999–2000 to 2009–'10. Within each racial/ethnic group, women earned the majority of degrees at all levels in 2009–'10. For example, among U.S. residents, black females earned 68 percent of associate's degrees, 66 percent of bachelor's degrees, 71 percent of master's degrees, and 65 percent of all doctor's degrees awarded to black students. Hispanic females earned 62 percent of associate's degrees, 61 percent of bachelor's degrees, 64 percent of master's degrees, and 55 percent of all doctor's degrees awarded to Hispanic students. (White women earned 61 percent of Associate's degrees, 56 percent of bachelor's degrees, 61.8 percent of master's, and 51.4 percent of doctorates.)


Despite the variety of my explorations, throughout it all it has been my contention that my responsibility as an artist is to work, to sing for my supper, to make art, beautiful and powerful, that adds and reveals; to beautify the mess of a messy world, to heal the sick and feed the helpless; to shout bravely from the roof-tops and storm barricaded doors and voice the specifics of our historic moment.


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{UAH} Side effects of national looting! You become shapeless and lack fitting clothes.


Image may contain: 1 person, standing
Kakwenza Rukirabashaija

Side effects of national looting! You become shapeless and lack fitting clothes.

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{UAH} Corbyn overtakes May in PM suitability poll for first time

Corbyn overtakes May in PM suitability poll for first time

A poll suggests more people think the Labour leader would make a better Prime Minister for the first time.

Jeremy Corbyn and Theresa May walking through the Houses of Parliament
Image:Jeremy Corbyn and Theresa May in Parliament for the Queen's Speech
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Jeremy Corbyn has overtaken Theresa May for the first time on the question of who voters think would be the best Prime Minister, a poll suggests.

The survey, by YouGov for The Times, puts the Labour leader on 35%, ahead of the Prime Minister on 34%.

Nearly a third of those asked said they were unsure.

When Mrs May called the election in April, she had a commanding lead over Mr Corbyn on the same question - 54% to 15%.

It is more bad news for the PM, who is under pressure after losing her majority in the snap election she called to increase her Brexit mandate.

In the days leading up to the vote (5-7 June), Mrs May was ahead by 43% to Mr Corbyn's 32%.

This suggests the aftermath of the election - in which she has been criticised over her response to the Grenfell Tower disaster - has had an impact.

The PM was also forced to scrap a number of unpopular manifesto pledges in this week's Queen's Speech, including reintroducing grammar schools, holding a vote on ending the ban on fox hunting and means-testing pensioners' winter fuel payments.

In his response to the Queen's Speech, a bullish Mr Corbyn said Labour is now a "government in waiting", although Mrs May mocked her rival, praising him for having "fought a spirited campaign and come a good second".

:: YouGov surveyed 1,670 British adults from 21-22 June.

 
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{UAH} Jeremy Corbyn set for rapturous reception at Glastonbury as chant goes viral

Moses Nekyon,

Jeremy Corbyn Has Become The New Messiah In The UK. No Politician Has Ever Been So Popular. May Be You Will Now Believe What I kept Wrting About That Many People Did Not Believe. The Man Has Caught The Popular Mood And Is Now The Embodiment Of The New UK That We Want. So Why Did People Misjudge Him Or The Mood Of The British People?

Bobby

LOVE THIS CHANT

Jeremy Corbyn is set for a rapturous reception when he steps on to the Pyramid stage tomorrow with 81-year-old festival founder Michael Eavis. People…

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{UAH} International Widows Day: “Invisible Women, Invisible Problems”.

International Widows Day: "Invisible Women, Invisible Problems".

By  on June 23, 2017 — #Widows globally and particularly in #Africa are victims of all types of harassment and discrimination emanating from several myths and misconceptions. After losing their husbands, widows may suffer a double blow of being accused of witchcraft, suffer inheritance denial and can even be shunned and neglected by society. Today is International Widows Day, a day set aside by the United Nations to bring attention to the plight of widows globally.

Image taken from: genderhub.org

Widows globally and particularly in Africa are victims of all types of harassment and discrimination emanating from several myths and misconceptions. After losing their husbands, widows may suffer a double blow of being accused of witchcraft, suffer inheritance denial and can even be shunned and neglected by society.

Today is International Widows Day, a day set aside by the United Nations to bring attention to the plight of widows globally. This year the commemorations run under the theme, "Invisible women, Invisible problems". There's a lot of stigmatisation surrounding widows, which has seen them being ostracised in society, being seen as having a streak of bad luck because of various religious and cultural practises. This is sadly despite the fact that many women have been widowed through wars.

In a statement on the commemoration of this day, the UN said, the children of widows are often affected, both emotionally and economically. Widowed mothers, now supporting their families alone, are forced to withdraw children from school and to rely on their labour. Moreover, the daughters of widows may suffer multiple deprivations, increasing their vulnerability to abuse. While the face of poverty across the continent is that of a woman, widows often suffer a double blow especially considering that women are often at the bottom of the radar economically.

Kawale Orphan Care in Lilongwe, Malawi. Here are some of the pastors, volunteers and orphans from Kawale Orphan Care. Image Credit: Flickr/ Khym54

According to the Thomson Reuters Foundation, a report by the World Widows Reportpublished by the Loomba Foundation estimates that there are 258.5 million widows globally with 584.6 million offspring. More so, widows are regularly accused of killing their husbands either deliberately or through neglect – including by transmitting HIV/AIDS – in India, Nepal, Papua New Guinea and sub-Saharan Africa. Property seizures and evictions by the late husband's family are widespread in many places including Angola, Bangladesh, Botswana, India, Ivory Coast, Ghana, Kenya, Malawi, Nigeria, Tanzania and Zimbabwe.

As indicated earlier, women are widowed due to armed conflict. In some parts of eastern Democratic Republic of the Congo, for instance, it is reported that around 50 per cent of women are widows, while there are an estimated three million widows in Iraq and over 70,000 in Kabul, Afghanistan.

It is with this in mind that the UN has encouraged governments to take action to uphold their commitments to ensure the rights of widows as enshrined in international law, including the Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Discrimination Against Women and the Convention on the Rights of the Child. Even when national laws exist to protect the rights of widows, weaknesses in the judicial systems of many States compromise how widows' rights are defended in practice and these challenges should be addressed.

More importantly as communities we have a mandate to ensure we empower widows and protect them from abuse. We have to ensure they have adequate healthcare, education, decent work, full participation in decision-making and public life, and lives free of violence and abuse. The loss of a loved one alone is life changing and difficult to go through, we should therefore give them a chance to build a secure life after bereavement. Creating these opportunities for widows helps protect their children and destroys the cycle of inter-generational poverty and deprivation.

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{UAH} UAE princesses guilty of servant abuse in Belgium

UAE princesses guilty of servant abuse in Belgium

  • 23 June 2017
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  • From the sectionEurope
One of the alleged victims (2ndR) arrives to attend the trial of the UAE princesses at the Brussels criminal court for human trafficking on 11 May 2017Image copyrightAFP
Image captionThe case dates back to 2008 but only came to court this year, after the defence's many procedural challenges

Eight princesses from the UAE have been convicted of human trafficking and degrading treatment of their servants by a Brussels court.

They were given 15-month suspended jail terms and ordered to pay €165,000 (£145,000; $185,000) each, with half the sum suspended.

They were accused of holding more than 20 servants they brought with them on a 2008 visit in near slavery.

But they were acquitted of the more serious charge of inhumane treatment.

The princesses had denied all the charges.

Their lawyer, Stephen Monod, said he was "satisfied to note that the Belgian justice has appropriately assessed this case which has generated many misconceptions for nearly 10 years".

Raped, pregnant and afraid of being jailed

Kuwait's abused domestic workers have 'nowhere to turn'

He was unable to confirm that his clients would pay their fines, saying they had not yet decided whether to appeal.

'No days off'

Sheikha Hamda al-Nahyan and her seven daughters did not attend the trial and rights activists said it was highly unlikely that the UAE would extradite them had they been jailed.

The case came to light when one of the servants escaped from the hotel where the princesses had hired a floor of luxury suites.

They said they were forced to be available 24 hours a day, had to sleep on the floor, were never given a day off, were prevented from leaving the hotel and were forced to eat the princesses' leftovers.

President of the United Arab Emirates, Sheikh Khalifa Bin Zayed Al Nahyan arrives at Clarence House on May 1, 2013 in London, UKImage copyrightGETTY IMAGES
Image captionThe princesses are relatives of UAE President Sheikh Khalifa Bin Zayed, pictured here visiting the British Royal family in 2013

But the case took nine years to get under way, partly due to legal challenges to proceedings by the defence.

Myria, a Belgian rights group which helped bring the case to court, said the importance of Friday's judgement "can hardly be overstated".

"Not because it is the end stage of a procedure that has been epic in length and complexity, nor because the location of the transgression was a prestigious hotel and the main perpetrators princesses.

"Domestic personnel hailing from all over the world, employed in an administrative and social limbo, in a secluded area presumed beyond the reach of the rule of law, were heard in a court of law and recognised as victims of human trafficking."

At the time of the trial, Nicholas McGeehan, an expert on migrant workers in the Gulf for Human Rights Watch, told the BBC that it would be "hugely significant" if one of the wealthiest families in the world was publicly linked with trafficking and slavery.

He argued that despite being abolished in law, domestic slavery continues in Gulf states - "perpetuated by ruling elites for whom it serves an important societal purpose in conferring status".

He added: "It's top-down and tolerated."

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